Author Archives: Archaeology Archives Administrator

Looking skywards: Kendrew’s cloud photography

In the blog of March 2017 about the problems of 35mm slides it was noted that “ Archaeologists don’t have ‘holidays’, they just have extra time to visit sites. Archaeologists also deliberately take photographs of aspects of sites that non-archaeologists don’t usually capture”  The same is also true of Geographers! Any opportunity to extend their […]

Then and Now: the Acropolis, Athens

When we were setting up the HEIR project, photographer and archaeology student Persefoni Lesgidi volunteered to rephotograph some of our HEIR images of Athens, with unexpected results. The upper image shows the Erectheum at the Acropolis, Athens (HEIR ID 38087). Persefoni’s photograph illustrates the changes that have taken place between c1890, when George Washington Wilson recorded […]

Burial place of Saints and Kings

A little while ago, HEIRtagger BoarsHill rephotographed some of our images on a trip to Northumberland, and filled us in on the story behind some of the sites. This is the beautiful image of Tynemouth Priory from the History of Art Department’s collection. BoarsHill commented that this is an important place: “Tynemouth castle, on the north […]

The 35mm crisis

The Society of Antiquaries has a newsletter, Salon. Recent editions of the newsletter have included discussions about what to do with the problem of 35mm slides, ranging from advice about how to choose which ones to throw away, to instructions on turning them into a fetching lampshade. Why are 35mm slides a problem, you might […]

From horse power to horsepower

This evocative image of a London horse-drawn bus standing in front of a motorised bus comes from a collection of glass plate negatives donated to our archive. This is the 48 service from Cambridge Road to Earls Court Road, according to the sign on the side: But when was it taken? We thought that horse-drawn and […]

Lifting the lid… an art history perspective

Happy New Year! The first post of 2017 is written by guest blogger Nathan Geyer, a second year undergraduate History of Art student from St Catherine’s College . Nathan has been working with HEIR on an internship placement. It has been fascinating to see the synergy between art history and the archives here at the Institute of Archaeology… Like […]

Then and Now: the Vindolanda Milestone

HEIR was created to help us understand monuments in changing landscapes. Your photographs showing ‘then’ and ‘now’ are giving a new insight into how the environment changes perceptions of what monuments are for. Martin Rush has been travelling in north England and sent us a rephotograph of HEIR ID 36501 (an image from Passmore’s lantern slide […]

We Get By with a Little Help from Our Friends

One of the delights of being part of the University of Oxford is discovering the sheer breadth as well as the depth of the collective knowledge of individuals here. We were recently reminded how great this range is when we came across this image in the HEIR Project archive from the Plant Science Collection of the Radcliffe […]

Comparing the past and the present: a room full of hypocaust pillars

This is an image from the Institute of Archaeology’s lantern slide collection of the Roman Villa at Chedworth, Gloucestershire. This lantern slide was made and sold by local commercial photographer Henry Taunt. Taunt (1842-1922) mainly photographed in Oxfordshire and the Thames Valley, and was a pioneer in both landscape and archaeological photography. HEIRtagger Martin Rush […]

A brief visual history of…

…the public convenience at York’s Bootham Bar. When most people look at images like  this one: …they see the towers of the fine cathedral at York, the impressive gate of the medieval city wall, or maybe their eye is caught by the posters advertising an ‘overcoat depot’ or the ‘York Herald – Daily’. HEIRtaggers are […]