Terms and Conditions

Using HEIR websites, terms and conditions, copyright, referencing, and requests to reproduce images

Using our website

You may use the HEIR crowdsourcing and online websites subject to the Terms and Conditions set out on this page. You should visit this page regularly to check the latest version of these Terms and Conditions. Access and use by you of this site constitutes acceptance by you of the Terms and Conditions in force at the time of use.

By using the Historic Environment Image Resource websites (the “Websites”) you agree to be bound by the Terms of Access. If you do not agree to be bound by these Terms of Access you are not permitted to use the Websites or access any of the images on them.

You are permitted to access the images on the Websites and to use and download them and share them for the purposes of non-commercial research, private study, personal use and non-commercial sharing and for no other purpose. You are not allowed to sell the images or use them for any profit making, commercial or business purposes.

Please contact the HEIR team in the first instance if you wish to use an image for commercial purposes.

HEIR may withdraw any image from the Websites at any time and for any reason, without giving a reason.

Copyright

HEIR has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that the reproduction of all images on the websites is done with the full consent of copyright owners and the respective collections. However, there are certain rights holders that have proved to be untraceable. Any queries in this respect should be addressed to heir@arch.ox.ac.uk. HEIR will remove images if requested to do so by rights holders.

Use by the Education Community

The images and material on the Websites can be used and downloaded for education purposes. Images can be used by schools, higher education and further education students and employees for non-commercial uses connected with education.

Commercial Use

The images and material on the Websites cannot be used freely or without permission for commercial purposes. Commercial purposes means any use of the content that is primarily intended for or directed toward commercial advantage or monetary compensation. This includes any use on or in anything that is itself charged for, is connected with something that is charged for or is intended to make a profit. For permission to reproduce for commercial purposes, please contact HEIR (heir@arch.ox.ac.uk).

Requesting high resolution images and permission to reproduce

Please contact HEIR in the first instance to obtain permission to reproduce images.

No charge is made for use of low-resolution HEIR photographs for non-commercial purposes, including reproduction in academic articles, student dissertations and essays, and lectures and presentations. Please contact HEIR (heir@arch.ox.ac.uk) for copies of high resolution images.

Referencing

When publishing any photograph sources from HEIR, for commercial or academic purposes, please include a full acknowledgement of HEIR, the collection holding institution. and the image reference.

Wherever possible, a credit to the photographer should be published with the photograph(s). The photographer’s name is indicated in the ‘Credit’ field of the metadata attached to each image.

 

Mobile Application

By using the Mobile application you agree to the terms and conditions laid out above.

Mobile app: rephotographing images

By uploading your rephotographed images to HEIR, you agree to allow your images to be available to the public under a creative commons, attribution non-commercial licence:

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/legalcode

It is your responsibility to check that you are not breaking any local restrictions in taking photographs and uploading them to HEIR. Please note that some countries have restrictions on photographing individuals and photographing monuments.

The University of Oxford’s Legal Notice at www.ox.ac.uk/legal applies to the HEIR websites. If there is any conflict between the Legal Notice and these Terms and Conditions, the latter shall prevail.

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